Image Index

Richard Ansdell, R.A., A Good Day's Sport - A Gamekeeper, his Dogs and Kill
Richard Ansdell, R.A. - A Good Day's Sport - A Gamekeeper, his Dogs and Kill

This subject matter is typical of Ansdell who injected his hunting and sporting scenes with a subtle melodrama, telling the story of the hunt in a single image. A Good Day’s Sport seems to tell of a fruitful but exhausting hunt, picturing a moment of respite after the action. Ansdell was a great lover of Scotland and each of his pictures seem an ode to the country, glorifying its traditions and landscape.

Robert Polhill Bevan, THE HANSOM CAB
Robert Polhill Bevan - THE HANSOM CAB

The Hansom Cab is a particularly refined example of Bevan’s urban horse paintings. Owned by family friends of Bevan since first purchase, and not seen in public for nearly seventy years, it demonstrates Bevan’s first-hand knowledge of the French avant-garde through his close contact with the Pont-Aven School in Brittany. Bevan had been allowed to give up the family banking business to study art in London and Paris and he spent time in Pont-Aven in the early 1890s.

Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones, Bart., A.R.A., King Cophetua and the Beggar Maid
Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones, Bart., A.R.A. - King Cophetua and the Beggar Maid

King Cophetua and the Beggar Maid is a smaller, experimental version of the oil painting that hangs in Tate Britain (1884) and the bodycolour, watercolour and pastel cartoon of the same subject in Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery (1883). A gouache and gum arabic picture (1883) of the same subject is in The Lord Lloyd-Webber Collection. According to a sixteenth century folk ballad, King Cophetua was an African King who, previously immune to female beauty, fell in love at first sight with a beggar maid.

Sir George Clausen, R.A., R.W.S., Harvest, Tying the Sheaves
Sir George Clausen, R.A., R.W.S. - Harvest, Tying the Sheaves

Sir George Clausen was an English artist of great longevity who held a position of huge importance in British art at the turn of the century. His art merges the worlds of natural realism and British Impressionism and provides a survey of predominantly rural pre- and post-World War I life in England. Over the course of his career, he developed a more fluid style, portraying movement and the play of sunlight and shade with flickering brushstrokes.

Sir George Clausen, R.A., R.W.S., R.I., Noon in the Hayfield
Sir George Clausen, R.A., R.W.S., R.I. - Noon in the Hayfield

In this beautiful painting of one of Clausen’s favourite models, Rose Grimsdale, rest, reverie and the sunlit glow of field and wildflowers combine to produce one of the most satisfying visions of the English countryside at the end of the nineteenth century. Clausen’s work contains sentiment but it is not sentimental. His art always conveyed a poetical appreciation of the natural world akin to the literary works of Thomas Hardy. Clausen’s observations of rural life were accurate but by the late nineties it had become clear that he and his French and British contemporaries were not so much recording the occupation of the country labourer as bolstering a threatened way of life.

Michael Thacker, Mantle
Michael Thacker - Mantle

In Mantle Thacker employs beautifully sinuous, serpentine lines of seemingly unravelling ‘S’ shaped curves which convey William Hogarth’s ideal Line of Beauty (an essential part of Hogarth’s theory of aesthetics as described in Analysis of Beauty (1753)). The sensuous, melodious shape animates the sculpture giving it a sense of lightness and energy, belying the heaviness of the marble. The exquisite smoothness of the polished marble, contrasts with the rougher, unpolished pieces of the stone.

Walter Howell Deverell, Twelfth Night, Act II, Scene IV
Walter Howell Deverell - Twelfth Night, Act II, Scene IV

Deverell’s Twelfth Night, painted when he was twenty-one, is undoubtedly his masterpiece. It is by far the largest of his few surviving paintings and was clearly intended to be a major statement and a bid for recognition. Everything about it betrays Deverell’s allegiance to the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood of which he remained one of their closest associates during the period. Deverell’s Twelfth Night is one of the last major early Pre-Raphaelite paintings to remain in private hands.

Hilda Fearon, Enchantment
Hilda Fearon - Enchantment

Hilda Fearon was an important female member of the British Impressionist movement. Born in Banstead, Surrey in 1878, to a wealthy London wine merchant, she was the younger sister of the painter Annie (Fearon) Walke. Fearon studied with her sister at the Chelsea Art School and at the Slade School and shortly thereafter they moved to Dresden together to study under Robert Sterl. They both then moved to Cornwall, where Fearon gained her most significant training with Algernon Talmage in St Ives from 1900, where many female painters of her day were drawn to paint.

Andrew Hemingway, Orchard
Andrew Hemingway - Orchard

Orchard is a wonderfully engaging work by Andrew Hemingway that captures the simultaneous beauty and ruggedness of the English countryside. Here, the artist focuses on the process of nature and seasonal change, depicting the effects of autumn on an orchard. In the foreground the earth is strewn with fallen apples, their red skins appearing to glisten even in the dull light from the clouded sky. Laying among the fruit are the fallen leaves from the tree above.

Harold Gilman, A London Street Scene in Snow
Harold Gilman - A London Street Scene in Snow

Gilman understood that the truly modern subject was the city, its back rooms and bed-sits and the quiet dignity of the isolated people who inhabited them. The perceived dislocation of his art may be seen in the painterly A London Street Scene in Snow which is almost completely disassociated from the urban sprawl and bustle. Always happiest with the static image, his cityscapes avoid the continual movement of the urban world.

John Calcott Horsley, R.A., Showing a Preference
John Calcott Horsley, R.A. - Showing a Preference

Mr Horsley’s naval lieutenant (H.M.S. Trifler) is “showing a preference” in a very indiscreet and decided manner. The very poppies hang their heads in shame.’ Punch (responding to the 1860 Royal Academy exhibit) In this work and others of his oeuvre, Horsley successfully depicts tight psychological narratives, incorporating figures who outwardly show a quiet, almost inscrutable, self-possession but whose internal thoughts are hinted at. Here, Horsley chooses a subject that serves as a metaphor for the shallowness of male romantic feelings, as the officer jilts one woman in preference for another.

William Holman Hunt, O.M., R.W.S., Homeward Bound (The Pathless Waters)
William Holman Hunt, O.M., R.W.S. - Homeward Bound (The Pathless Waters)

‘The moon makes for herself a clear path through clouds which crown, or rather encircle, her head with a halo of iridescent light. The sea beneath shines as burnished silver.’ The Art Journal Homeward Bound was painted in 1869 and sent to England in the autumn of the following year to be exhibited at the Old Watercolour Society, as the artist’s letter of 12 October to A.W. Hunt reveals: ‘I have lately sent home a couple of water colour drawings and I wish to give them to be mounted and framed to a safe man….

William Holman Hunt, O.M., R.W.S., Il Dolce Far Niente
William Holman Hunt, O.M., R.W.S. - Il Dolce Far Niente

Begun in 1859, put aside and taken up again in 1865, and finally exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1867, this picture marked a radical departure for Hunt, as the title alone - with its Italian colloquial implication of ‘sweet idleness’ or ‘indolence’ indicates. No member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood had been more single-minded than Hunt in his determination to paint serious subjects replete with meaning and moral significance. His early works, if they had not been based on the Bible or Shakespeare, had at least had this ethical dimension, and in 1854 he had taken this approach to its logical conclusion by going to the Holy Land to paint biblical events on the very spot where they had occurred.

Henri Martin, Bucolique
Henri Martin - Bucolique

A native of Toulouse, Henri Martin’s roots in the South of France gave him an innate love of sun-drenched landscapes and a profound sense of man’s need to coexist harmoniously with nature. His paintings evoke the southern sun and have an other-worldly, dream-like atmosphere, often celebrating mankind embroiled in and at one with his surroundings. Martin studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and received a grant enabling him to go to Paris to continue his studies.

Roderic O'Conor, Entrance to Village, Brittany
Roderic O'Conor - Entrance to Village, Brittany

‘I like Brittany; here I find a savage, primitive quality. When my clogs echo on this granite ground, I hear the dull, muted, powerful sound I am looking for in painting.’ Paul Gauguin In 1895 O’Conor left the town of Pont-Aven in Finistère and moved his base further inland to the picturesque village and artists’ colony of Rochefort-en-terre in the Morbihan district of Brittany. Pont-Aven had become overrun with artists and tourists by this date, and O’Conor would have been charmed by the unspoilt character and colourful history of Rochefort with its twelfth-century church and fourteenth-century ruined castle.

Samuel John Peploe, Red, Pink and Yellow Roses in a Blue Vase
Samuel John Peploe - Red, Pink and Yellow Roses in a Blue Vase

Through his still life painting, Samuel John Peploe experimented with the manipulation of colour and form. Working in his sun-drenched studio, the artist surrounded himself with potential subjects. As described by Elizabeth Cumming: ‘Flowers in season, roses following on from tulips, partner ceramic bowls or vases, set against a length of beautiful fabric (sometimes purchased from the Edinburgh furnishers Whytock & Reid), all so carefully selected, arranged and rearranged time and again before brush was ever put to canvas.

Camille Pissarro, BOUQUET DE FLEURS; IRIS, COQUELICOTS ET FLEURS DE CHOUX
Camille Pissarro - BOUQUET DE FLEURS; IRIS, COQUELICOTS ET FLEURS DE CHOUX

With Pissarro’s painting Bouquet de Fleurs; Iris, Coquelicots et Fleurs de Choux, we see an artist – a master - completely at ease in his style. There is a completeness of design and technique, with a harmony and synthesis of colour and texture; tones are perfectly balanced within a perfectly balanced structure of composition. The brushwork, although bold, has a delicacy of control and execution which gives a calm and tranquil air to the exuberance of the colourisation – the technique appears simple belying the complexity of the artist’s handling.

Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Christmas Carol
Dante Gabriel Rossetti - Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol is one of Rossetti’s earliest of a series of half-length depictions of women playing musical instruments. The connection with female beauty, music and the fashion for exotic decoration and costume were central themes of the emerging English Aesthetic movement – the revolutionary artistic style of the 1860s and 1870s that combined elements of Renaissance, Oriental and Classical styles to create an époque that was to be as important in Britain as Art Nouveau was in Europe.

Philip Wilson Steer, A Summer's Evening
Philip Wilson Steer - A Summer's Evening

One of the most academically important works by Philip Wilson Steer, A Summer’s Evening is physically large and is not only the artist’s first major work in a fully-fledged divisionist manner, but also possibly the first by any British artist. Steer’s series of sun-drenched beach scenes in Walberswick and northern France evoke the techniques of Impressionism and in places, experiment with the pointillist technique of neo-impressionism. A Summer’s Evening is an intense experimental departure from Steer’s overture to Impressionism, indebted to the style of Monet, Sisley and Pissarro, but with Steer’s singular response to the form and colour of his chosen subject.

Philip Wilson Steer, O.M., A TURN OF THE CARDS
Philip Wilson Steer, O.M. - A TURN OF THE CARDS

In the late 1880s and by the beginning of the 1890s, Steer was the leading exponent and most progressive of English artists who were taking their inspiration from their French impressionist counterparts. His series of sun-drenched scenes with their close analyses of tone and shadow, evaporating forms and sparkling, broken touches of colour came closer to French Impressionism than anything. He was the most radical artist in Britain, unorthodox and exceptional, employing a distinctive autographic quality of painting and working in a number of different styles simultaneously whilst always maintaining an interest in the relationship between sensation and expression and often creating a visionary intensity.

Philip Wilson Steer, O.M., Chatterboxes
Philip Wilson Steer, O.M. - Chatterboxes

In Chatterboxes Steer utilised the same techniques employed by the French impressionists. He separated colour and even experimented with the radical effects of the neo-impressionists, believing that light would emanate from tiny touches of pure colour, fractured into small directional strokes that convey the sense of quietly rustling surfaces. He depicts the flickering sunshine in a French landscape and there is a sense of carefree, relaxation and joie de vivre in this evocative canvas showing the glowing faces of gossiping girls who are dressed in the same two-tone blue cotton that was in common use for ouvrière garments and school clothes throughout northern France.

Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, O.M., R.A., Loves Jewelled Fetter (The Betrothal Ring)
Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, O.M., R.A. - Loves Jewelled Fetter (The Betrothal Ring)

‘for the first-time classical genre subjects were represented with verisimilitude, learning and technical mastery.’ F. G. Stephens, ‘Alma-Tadema’, Artists at Home III This painting is typical of many of Alma-Tadema’s works from the latter part of his career. From the 1880s onwards his paintings were generally small-scale domestic scenes, illustrating either a minor incident or a moment of repose and contemplation. They are ambitious reconstructions of Rome frequently depicting its wealthy citizens at leisure.

James Jacques Joseph Tissot, Algernon Marsden
James Jacques Joseph Tissot - Algernon Marsden

Tissot’s portrait of Algernon Moses Marsden captures the man at his most successful. The sitter appears a debonair and sophisticated man-about-town; he holds a cigar nonchalantly in his right hand and gazes directly at the viewer, his head leaning lightly on his left hand, a subtle gold ring shines on his little finger; he is the epitome of insouciant style, and fashionable, suave ennui. He sits on a leather chair and the space surrounding him is indicative of a man’s study or fashionable club.

Lorenzo Bartolini, Young Bacchus
Lorenzo Bartolini - Young Bacchus

The sculpture depicts a young Bacchus, the mythological Greek god of wine, sculpted out of a luminous white marble and standing in a wine barrel amongst grapes and vines. Bartolini has cleverly utilised the classical contrapposto pose, characterised by a single weight-bearing leg, a bent knee and tilted hips, as a mode to complement Bacchus’ mythology; in this sculpture, he is depicted to be making wine in the traditional manner by stamping on the grapes with bare feet so to release their juice ready for fermentation.

Nadia Benois, Kitchen Still Life
Nadia Benois - Kitchen Still Life

Still Life with Fruit depicts a table still life scene (presumably) in a kitchen. A crisp white table cloth is laid unequally over a dark oval shaped wooden table which is complete with an assortment of vegetables and fruit, such as lettuces, onions, leeks and fennels in the forefront of the painting, and a woven basket and ceramic water-jug in the mid to background. The painting itself is characterised by bold, earthy and warm tones, such as ochres, reds, blues, greens and browns, in addition to brighter and more vibrant colours, such as yellows and reds.

Robert Auger Brown, The Fishing Hut, Eddington Fishery
Robert Auger Brown - The Fishing Hut, Eddington Fishery

The Fishing Hut, Eddington Fishery is a relatively modern work, although the subject, palette and style bring together the traditions of the Barbizon School and Post-Impressionism. This charming and peaceful scene, executed locally at Eddington stages the beautiful nearby countryside with a sense of untouched timelessness and solitude. Robert (Bob) Brown is an honorary life member of the New English Art Club. His artistic career started early; he studied under Lionel Bulmer and Fred Dubery at Croydon College of Art and at the age of seventeen, he exhibited his first painting at the Royal Academy.

Sir George Clausen, R.A., The Spreading Tree
Sir George Clausen, R.A. - The Spreading Tree

The Spreading Tree was one of the four paintings Clausen exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1901. It was painted when the artist and his family were living in Widdington, near Newport in Essex, an area surrounded by large oaks, which were often painted by the artist and featured in his lectures at the Royal Academy. George Clausen’s four pictures at the Royal Academy in 1901 demonstrated the range and depth of his rural subject matter.

Sir George Clausen, R.A., Summer in the Fields
Sir George Clausen, R.A. - Summer in the Fields

By the turn of the century Clausen’s Impressionist handling was instantly recognised by critics. His palette was rich and varied; he saw colour in shadows and was fully aware of the visual excitement of complementary colour contrasts. In the depiction of landscape he often adopted an aerial viewpoint locating foreground figures on a plane which takes the spectator confidently from the foreground, through the middle distance to the background. In these works a windswept sky with scudding clouds occupies the upper third of the canvas.

Edgar Degas, Portrait D'Achille Degas
Edgar Degas - Portrait D'Achille Degas

‘Make portraits of people in typical, familiar poses’ (An excerpt from Degas' notebooks in the late 1860s, quoted in Exh. cat., Degas Portraits, Zurich, 1994, p. 90). Dating from circa 1864, the present work was painted just a few years before Degas turned towards the ballet as his primary inspiration; however, the portraits of his early oeuvre are some of his most intense and personal, and found him his initial success as an artist.

Edgar Degas, L'enfant en Bleu
Edgar Degas - L'enfant en Bleu

Edgar Degas is, of course, famous as one of the founders of the Impressionist movement. He was heavily influenced by the realism of artists such as Courbet and Corot and was instrumental in the avant garde Impressionist exhibitions. He is renowned for his later pastel and oil pictures of dancers, racehorse and interior scenes, in which he displays his superb draughtsmanship and the vivid colouristic techniques of the Impressionists. Following his rigorous academic training, in 1856, Degas travelled to Italy where he stayed for three years, copying works by Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian and other Renaissance artists.

Henri Lebasque, Autoportrait
Henri Lebasque - Autoportrait

In this self-portrait, Lebasque treats an oil sketch like pastel, employing dry, broad, quick brushstrokes, giving a chalky finish. It is reminiscent of Degas’ pastels in the visible singular colours that create shade and light. A bright sunlight is evident in the cool white on the hat and the white highlight on the face and sheen on the nose, contrasted with the deep shadow of the rest of the face beneath the hat.

Henri Lebasque, La Corbeille de Fruits
Henri Lebasque - La Corbeille de Fruits

“Intimism, a term which best describes Lebasque’s painting, refers to the close domestic subject matter, supremely realized by Bonnard and Vuillard, in such a manner as to convey the personal nature of his response to the thing painted, and the universal familiarity of home and family. There is a sense of calm infused in Lebasque’s paintings which celebrates the fullness and richness of life. In his placid scenes of gardens and beaches, terraces and dinner tables, Lebasque portrays his family in particular, but in such a way that he appeals to a larger sense of family gathering and devotion” (L.

Élisée Maclet, Rue Lepic, Campanile Sacré Coeur, Vue de Montmartre
Élisée Maclet - Rue Lepic, Campanile Sacré Coeur, Vue de Montmartre

Jules Émile Élisée Maclet (12 April 1881 – 23 August 1962) was a French Impressionist painter, particularly well known for his views of Montmartre. He was born in Lihons-en-Santerre, Picardy, and was the son of a gardener and a laundress. He began his artistic career as something of a weekend painter; Maclet became a choirboy for the local parish church and Father Delval, the parish priest (also an amateur painter), would take the young Maclet out to sketch and paint in the countryside.

Henri Martin, La Conversation
Henri Martin - La Conversation

Painstakingly composed of small touches of brilliant colours La Conversation illustrates Henri Martin’s mastery of Neo-Impressionist technique. Depicting an outdoor scene, the picture captures the vibrant effect of sunlight and subtle variations of perfectly harmonised tones. Decomposing the spectrum of light into small brushstrokes of pure colour, La Conversation shows Martin’s ability as a storyteller, colourist, as well as a Neo-Impressionist painter. Two women are in deep conversation in the foreground, whilst at the same time the artist suggests that they may also be sewing or knitting.

Henri Martin, La Moisson
Henri Martin - La Moisson

At this time in his career, Martin was greatly influenced by the post impressionists. Light had filled his canvas following a scholarship from the Salon to study in Italy and he had moved away from historical and biblical subjects painted in a precise academic tradition to light-filled, dream-like, often symbolist, tranquil canvases painted en plein air, merging an impressionist and pointillist technique with idyllic interpretations of the landscape. He largely abandoned allegory for depictions of joyful nature shrouded in a hazy glow.

Henri Martin, Le Port de Marseilles
Henri Martin - Le Port de Marseilles

Henri Martin was born in Toulouse in 1860. He studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and received a grant enabling him to go to Paris to continue his studies. In 1885 he travelled to Italy where he observed the Italian Renaissance masters which had a lasting and profound effect on his work. The work of Giotto, in particular, with his tranquil, light-filled landscapes, helped Martin to distance himself from his academic training and develop his own style which had affinities to Symbolism.

Henri Martin, Les Fauchers
Henri Martin - Les Fauchers

Light had filled Martin’s canvasses following a scholarship from the Salon to study in Italy and he had moved away from historical and biblical subjects painted in a precise academic tradition to light-filled, dream-like, often symbolist, tranquil canvases painted en plein air, merging an impressionist and pointillist technique with idyllic interpretations of the landscape. Although an easel painter throughout his life, it was as a decorative artist that Martin made his name.

Henry Mee, Portrait of Sir Peter Michael
Henry Mee - Portrait of Sir Peter Michael

Henry Mee was born in Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire. He is particularly well known for his portraits. He studied at University of Leeds (1975–9) and his teachers included Lawrence Gowing, Tim Clark, Griselda Pollock, Francis Fraschina and Terry Atkinson. Mee considers himself “a figurative painter in the English tradition, working from life and drawing being of paramount importance”. He made a big impression with his exhibition British Eminences: Portraits of our Age, at Sotheby’s London, which opened on 23rd May 1990.

Henry Moore, O.M., C.H., Working Model for Locking Piece
Henry Moore, O.M., C.H. - Working Model for Locking Piece

“Most everything I do, I intend to make on a large scale … Size itself has its own impact and physically we can relate ourselves more strongly to a big sculpture. At least I do.” - Henry Moore Cast in 1962, the same year Sir Peter and Lady Michael were married, this piece was bought at Christie’s in November 1986. The previous owners, Mr and Mrs James A. Clark Jr from Dallas, Texas, had purchased the work directly from Henry Moore after visiting his studio.

Katherine Palmers-Needham - An Installation: 28 Abstracts

Katherine Palmers-Needham is an abstract painter interested in colour and the nature of paint. Katherine was born in London in 1970 and later returned there to study for her degree in painting. In 2003 Katherine graduated from Chelsea College of Art with a First-Class Honours degree. Katherine Palmers-Needham loves the excitement of making paint sing and play. Her paintings are created through a process of addition and subtraction. She builds up multiple layers of colour with translucent glazes, mixing her pigments with specialist oil mediums for varying effects.

Image courtesy of Donna Reid, The Peter Michael Winery, California
Image courtesy of Donna Reid - The Peter Michael Winery, California

I think HAVING LAND and NOT RUINING IT is the MOST BEAUTIFUL ART that anybody could ever want" - Andy Warhol Donna Reid is a professional photographer who specialises in natural photography, and is based near Lake Tahoe in California, United States. Donna has worked with the Peter Michael Winery as a photographer since 2015 by capturing its day-to-day workings. She was awarded a degree in photojournalism from the University of Florida, and is passionate about creating “compelling” and “remarkable images” of nature using natural light using her digital camera.

Image courtesy of Donna Reid, The Peter Michael Winery, California
Image courtesy of Donna Reid - The Peter Michael Winery, California

I think HAVING LAND and NOT RUINING IT is the MOST BEAUTIFUL ART that anybody could ever want" - Andy Warhol Donna Reid is a professional photographer who specialises in natural photography, and is based near Lake Tahoe in California, United States. Donna has worked with the Peter Michael Winery as a photographer since 2015 by capturing its day-to-day workings. She was awarded a degree in photojournalism from the University of Florida, and is passionate about creating “compelling” and “remarkable images” of nature using natural light using her digital camera.

Image courtesy of Donna Reid, The Peter Michael Winery, California
Image courtesy of Donna Reid - The Peter Michael Winery, California

I think HAVING LAND and NOT RUINING IT is the MOST BEAUTIFUL ART that anybody could ever want" - Andy Warhol Donna Reid is a professional photographer who specialises in natural photography, and is based near Lake Tahoe in California, United States. Donna has worked with the Peter Michael Winery as a photographer since 2015 by capturing its day-to-day workings. She was awarded a degree in photojournalism from the University of Florida, and is passionate about creating “compelling” and “remarkable images” of nature using natural light using her digital camera.

Image courtesy of Donna Reid, The Peter Michael Winery, California
Image courtesy of Donna Reid - The Peter Michael Winery, California

I think HAVING LAND and NOT RUINING IT is the MOST BEAUTIFUL ART that anybody could ever want" - Andy Warhol Donna Reid is a professional photographer who specialises in natural photography, and is based near Lake Tahoe in California, United States. Donna has worked with the Peter Michael Winery as a photographer since 2015 by capturing its day-to-day workings. She was awarded a degree in photojournalism from the University of Florida, and is passionate about creating “compelling” and “remarkable images” of nature using natural light using her digital camera.

Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida, Portrait of Mrs Orville E. Babcock
Joaquin Sorolla Y Bastida - Portrait of Mrs Orville E. Babcock

Mrs Orville Babcock was one of a series of portrait commissions undertaken by Sorolla during his stay in Chicago in the early months of 1911. Having first visited New York to present the Hispanic Society of America with some of his new works, Sorolla travelled to Chicago in February, to attend the opening of his major solo exhibition, where the 161 works were viewed by over 100,000 visitors. During this time, Sorolla painted several portrait commissions, four of which, including this work, were included in an exhibition of Portraits at the Art Institute of Chicago the following year.

Philip Wilson Steer, O.M., The Horse-Shoe Bend of the Severn, at Littledean
Philip Wilson Steer, O.M. - The Horse-Shoe Bend of the Severn, at Littledean

Steer spent the summer of 1909 painting at the house of his friend, J.L. Harrison, whose home overlooked the famous horse-shoe bend of the River Severn at Littledean in Gloucestershire. Steer executed six large canvases of this subject, each painted under different light and weather conditions. Three paintings from the series are now in public collections: Municipal Art Gallery, Dublin; Aberdeen Art Gallery; and Manchester City Art Gallery. Bruce Laughton (loc.

Adrian Stokes, Evening on the Kennet
Adrian Stokes - Evening on the Kennet

Evening on the Kennet has all the influences and suggestions that originate with the Barbizon school and the later influences of the realist painter Jules Bastien-Lepage. However, rather than being a subject painted on the edges of the forest of Fountainbleu, this is a charming local Berkshire scene along the river Kennet. Adrian Stokes depicts a peaceful atmospheric river landscape with a worker returning with a boat full of vegetation, against either a sunrise or sunset framed by a towering backdrop of trees and reeds.

Graham Sutherland, O.M., Vine Pergola
Graham Sutherland, O.M. - Vine Pergola

Graham Sutherland made his first trip to the South of France in 1947, a visit which would come to have a profound impact on his both his life and artistic aesthetic. Sutherland returned every summer to the Cote d’Azur where he mingled with glamorous expats such as Somerset Maugham and met both Picasso and Matisse. In 1955 he and his wife Kathleen bought a house in Menton, near the Italian border.

Theo van Rysselberghe, Vase de Fleurs
Theo van Rysselberghe - Vase de Fleurs

Theo van Rysselberghe (1862-1926) was one of the most important figures in the field of Neo-Impressionism. He introduced the pointillist technique into Belgium and played a major role in the artistic circle of the Brussels avant-garde which in the late nineteenth century was a leading centre of new and exciting international art. The artist made his first steps towards Impressionism from 1880 and in 1883 became one of the six founders of Les XX, a Belgian artistic circle of young radical artists who, like the French Impressionists, rebelled against outmoded academia.

Johannes von Stumm - Arches

Johannes von Stumm was born in Munich in Germany. He gained his diploma in Fine Art from the Academy in Munich in 1989. He became a fellow of the Royal British Society of Sculptors and was elected President of the society in 2009.

Anna Zinkeisen, Portrait of Consuela Kennedy in Evening Dress
Anna Zinkeisen - Portrait of Consuela Kennedy in Evening Dress

The sitter was born in 1907 in Zuito, Equador, where her father was manager of the Railway and several hotels. Her mother was Spanish and she was educated in England. She became a well-known socialite and was in particular, a great friend of Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh. She married three times and died in 1975. Anna Katrina Zinkeisen, was born at Kilcreggan, Dumbartonshire on 29 August 1901, daughter of Victor Zinkeisen (1863-1929), a timber merchant, and his wife Clare née Bolton-Charles.

Doris Zinkeisen, Harlequin and Pierrot
Doris Zinkeisen - Harlequin and Pierrot

The present work depicts one of the artist’s favourite subjects, stage and theatre. As the subject suggests, the scene shows three figures in classic pantomime costume. The amusing harlequin wears a mask and a distinctive diamond-patterned outfit and dances around the elegant and beautiful central female figure, whilst a more sinisterly dressed masked musician plays his instrument, allowing the actress to gently dance. Doris Zinkeisen was born at Rosneath, Argyll, Scotland on 31 July 1898, daughter of Victor Zinkeisen (5 July 1863-30 October 1929), a timber merchant and amateur artist, and his wife Clara née Bolton-Charles (7 September 1869-1952), Doris’s younger sister was Anna Zinkeisen.

Doris Zinkeisen - Theatrical Designs

Doris Zinkeisen was born at Rosneath, Argyll, Scotland on 31 July 1898, daughter of Victor Zinkeisen (5 July 1863-30 October 1929), a timber merchant and amateur artist, and his wife Clara née Bolton-Charles (7 September 1869-1952), Doris’s younger sister was Anna Zinkeisen. In 1909, the family moved to Pinner, near Harrow and she studied at Harrow School of Art and in 1917 won a scholarship to the Royal Academy Schools, where she studied with her sister.

Doris Zinkeisen, The Woman with the Cigar
Doris Zinkeisen - The Woman with the Cigar

The Woman with the Cigar is a powerful oil painting of Katherine Dunham, a famous American dancer and choreographer. The scene is taken from her dance Caribbean Rhapsody. Dunham had spent two years travelling in the Caribbean studying all aspects of dance, and it was in Haiti that she became particularly inspired by the ethnographic field notes on Vodun rituals that she had made during her time there. Dunham drew on these to inform her Afro-Caribbean inspired dances which, to a predominantly European-dominated dance world, were ground-breaking both to audiences and critics alike.

John William Waterhouse,  R.A. (Rome 1849-1917 London), Lamia
John William Waterhouse, R.A. (Rome 1849-1917 London) - Lamia

Having exhibited a painting of Lamia in 1905 (now in the Auckland Art Gallery) and made three additional treatments of the two-figure composition, Waterhouse sent to the Royal Academy’s 1909 Summer Exhibition this one-figure picture bearing the same title. In it the same young woman, arranges her hair alone while studying herself in the water’s reflection. Waterhouse had occasionally shown women with one or both breasts exposed, most notably in Echo and Narcissus (1903, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool Museums).

Harry Watson, R.W.S., R.O.I., R.W.A. (1871-1936), The Garden Party
Harry Watson, R.W.S., R.O.I., R.W.A. (1871-1936) - The Garden Party

Primarily known for his landscape studies, The Garden Party is at the pinnacle of Watson’s rare ventures into figurative painting. In the late Edwardian summers, nature was seemingly bountiful, and women and children could often be seen enjoying the outdoors. Garden scenes provided Impressionist artists with ideal settings in which to develop their own interpretation of the modern concepts of naturalism and spontaneity, through new techniques using colour and light effects, and a greater sense of dynamism and atmosphere.

George Frederick Watts, O.M., R.A. (1817-1904), Endymion
George Frederick Watts, O.M., R.A. (1817-1904) - Endymion

‘There is the most beautiful of all his pictures the Dream of Endymion…' Edward Coley Burne-Jones In Greek mythology, Selene (the goddess of the moon who was sometimes regarded as the personification of the moon itself), is known for her affair with the beautiful mortal Endymion, the young shepherd who used to sleep on a mountaintop, and with whom she had fifty daughters. In Roman mythology, Diana has the attributes of Selene and a similar myth tells of her falling in love with Endymion.

George Frederick Watts, O.M., R.A. (1817-1904), Love and Life
George Frederick Watts, O.M., R.A. (1817-1904) - Love and Life

G. F. Watts is one of the most remarkable and versatile figures in Victorian art. During his long career of some seventy years, he made major contributions to history painting, the mural revival, portraiture, landscape, high Victorian classicism, symbolism, and the new sculpture. Watts, particularly with his more Symbolist paintings, dared to take risks and he ‘dragged English painting out of the eighteenth century and propelled it into the twentieth.’ (Jefferies.

George Frederick Watts, O.M., R.A. (1817-1904), Orpheus and Eurydice
George Frederick Watts, O.M., R.A. (1817-1904) - Orpheus and Eurydice

‘And now they were not far from the verge of the upper earth. He, enamoured, fearing lest she should flag and impatient to behold her, turned his eyes; and immediately she sank back again. She, hapless one! both stretching out her arms and struggling to be grasped and to grasp him, caught nothing but the fleeting air. And now, dying a second time, she did not at all complain of her husband; for why should she complain of being beloved?